bossanovabyss:

cranky-crustaceans:

pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

Pixar you have no idea how much this actually helps me.

Number eight needs an addendum that I don’t see here, and that is:
Have an ending in mind, but DO NOT MARRY IT.
Too often writers make a mistake of writing to an ending. This suffocates their characters and their story; instead of letting them grow and evolve and letting the story take its natural course, writers force the characters and the plot to meet a predetermined ending. Sure, maybe you decide on the ending and things work out naturally, but too often things don’t happen that way. Too often your characters and your plot end up growing and changing and taking a different turn, and that’s okay, you have to let them. Writing to a specific ending—being married to the ending you envisioned—ends up strangling your story. Sure, have a vague ending in mind. Know, generally, how you want the story to end. But don’t write it beforehand to the point where you’re writing to it. Narratives are road trips, not trips to the supermarket. You know generally where you want to end up, but everything that happens along the way—and the ultimate destination—is and should always be a surprise. Or at the very least, you should always be open to detours.
I also take issue with “story is testing, not refining” because you always need to refine your work to some degree after you write it, but number eight was the biggest offense here.

bossanovabyss:

cranky-crustaceans:

pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

Pixar you have no idea how much this actually helps me.

Number eight needs an addendum that I don’t see here, and that is:

  • Have an ending in mind, but DO NOT MARRY IT.

Too often writers make a mistake of writing to an ending. This suffocates their characters and their story; instead of letting them grow and evolve and letting the story take its natural course, writers force the characters and the plot to meet a predetermined ending. Sure, maybe you decide on the ending and things work out naturally, but too often things don’t happen that way. Too often your characters and your plot end up growing and changing and taking a different turn, and that’s okay, you have to let them. Writing to a specific ending—being married to the ending you envisioned—ends up strangling your story. Sure, have a vague ending in mind. Know, generally, how you want the story to end. But don’t write it beforehand to the point where you’re writing to it. Narratives are road trips, not trips to the supermarket. You know generally where you want to end up, but everything that happens along the way—and the ultimate destination—is and should always be a surprise. Or at the very least, you should always be open to detours.

I also take issue with “story is testing, not refining” because you always need to refine your work to some degree after you write it, but number eight was the biggest offense here.

(via ticktockdearie)

At a lecture I was giving in a large West Coast university in the Spring of 2008, the female students talked extensively about how much they preferred to have a completely waxed pubic area as it made them feel “clean,” “hot” and “well groomed.” As they excitedly insisted that they themselves chose to have a Brazilian wax, one student let slip that her boyfriend had complained when she decided to give up on waxing. Then there was silence. I asked the student to say more about her boyfriend’s preferences and how she felt about his criticism. As she started to speak other students joined in, only now the conversation took a very different turn. The excitement in the room gave way to a subdued discussion on how some boyfriends had even refused to have sex with non-waxed girlfriends as they “looked gross.” One student told the group how her boyfriend bought her a waxing kit for Valentine’s Day, while yet another sent out an email to his friends joking about his girlfriend’s “hairy beaver.” No, she did not break up with him, she got waxed instead.

Two weeks after the waxing discussion, I was at an East Coast Ivy League school where some female students became increasingly angry. They accused me of denying them free choice in their embracing of our hypersexualized porn culture, and being the next generation’s elite women, this idea was especially repugnant because they saw no limits or constraints on them as women. Literally two minutes later, one of the students made a joke about the “trick” that many of them employ as a way to avoid hookup sex. What is this trick? These women purposely don’t shave or wax as they are getting ready to go out that night so they will feel too embarrassed to participate in hookup sex. As she spoke, I watched as others nodded their heads in agreement. When I asked why they couldn’t just say no to sex, they informed me that once you have a few drinks in you, and are at a party or a bar, it is too hard to say no. I was speechless, not least because they had just been arguing that I had denied them agency in my discussion of porn culture, and yet they saw no contradiction in telling me that they didn’t have the agency to say no to sex. The next day I flew to Utah to give a lecture in a small college, which although not a religious college, had a good percentage of Mormons and Catholics. I told them about the lecture the previous night and asked them if they knew what the trick was. It turns out that trick is everywhere, including Utah.

I tell this story because, on many levels, it neatly captures how the porn culture is affecting young women’s lives. The reality is that women don’t need to look at porn to be profoundly affected by it because images, representations, and messages of porn are now delivered to women via pop culture. Women today are still not major consumers of hard-core porn; they are, however, whether they know it or not, internalizing porn ideology, an ideology that often masquerades as advice on how to be hot, rebellious, and cool in order to attract (and hopefully keep) a man. An excellent example is genital waxing, which first became popular in porn (not least because it makes the women look pre-pubescent) and then filtered down into women’s media such as Cosmopolitan, a magazine that regularly features stories and tips on what “grooming” methods women should adopt to attract a man. Sex and the City, that hugely successful show with an almost cult following, also used waxing as a storyline. For instance, in the movie, Miranda is chastised by Samantha for “letting herself go” by having pubic hair.

Visible or Invisible: Growing up Female in a Porn Culture

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

(via pocketful-of-rainbows)

haiweewicci:

micdotcom:

DreamWorks animator imagines the “Rejected Princesses” Hollywood would never touch 

While fans have taken to creating their own “racebent” versions of classic Disney characters, the question still remains: Given how many great female characters there are in history and in literature, why is Disney not willing to look outside the box?

That was the question on former DreamWorks animator Jason Porath’s mind when he launched his project “Rejected Princesses.” Describing himself as “a guy who likes interesting, lesser-known women and would like for them to get their time in the sun,” Porath decided to create Disneyfied versions of female characters who would have a hard time receiving the green light from the studio.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

If that is the Corn Maiden I am thinking about…there is no way they could ever, EVER sanitize her enough for a Disney movie. LOL

(via freespirited-wonder)

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.
PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

(via wolf-at-the-gate)

surrealistfemme:

Hijab Tutorial for Eid by Nabiilabee

How beautiful

(via nionlead)

‘Men get raped and molested,’ should be a whole sentence. If you have to tack on the word ‘too,’ then you’re using the experience of male victims to silence females instead of giving them their own space.
(via goldenphoenixgirl)

(via pocketful-of-rainbows)

tinychocolatemoose:

phoenix-falls:

vagisodium:

uninhibitedandunrepentant:

lovesthesmarty:

lsama:

This is the best idea for a restaurant. - Imgur
I DON’T THINK IT’S LITERALLY POSSIBLE FOR ME TO LIKE OR FAV OR UPVOTE THIS ENOUGH

I would like to see more of these.

Is this not a thing in America?
It’s a thing all over here in Australia. You get a wrist band. Means you can buy no booze, but you get free soft drink.

this is a thing in canada too like all you gotta do is say that youre driving

Free….pop….in the US for….DD’s? Free…anything to encourage safe behaviours? 
That’s too much logic for this country. Sounds like Socialist propaganda 

ha hahaha

tinychocolatemoose:

phoenix-falls:

vagisodium:

uninhibitedandunrepentant:

lovesthesmarty:

lsama:

This is the best idea for a restaurant. - Imgur

I DON’T THINK IT’S LITERALLY POSSIBLE FOR ME TO LIKE OR FAV OR UPVOTE THIS ENOUGH

I would like to see more of these.

Is this not a thing in America?

It’s a thing all over here in Australia. You get a wrist band. Means you can buy no booze, but you get free soft drink.

this is a thing in canada too like all you gotta do is say that youre driving

Free….pop….in the US for….DD’s? Free…anything to encourage safe behaviours? 

That’s too much logic for this country. Sounds like Socialist propaganda 

ha hahaha

cyber-heroine:

jolyneshepard:

emperorirene:

shepardtaichou:

why are people so caught up in romanticizing the past? romanticize the future. there will be robots and slightly more equality

That’s what they thought 50 years ago too.

THERE ARE ROBOTS AND SLIGHTLY MORE EQUALITY

(via ticktockdearie)

kayblodg said: My grandmother and grandfather lived in separate villages in Ukraine. They were taken to a prison camp during WW2. My grandmother was engaged to someone, who forced her to try to escape with him. They failed, and she was shot 3 times. After that, she met my grandfather in the camp and they fell in love. They planned an escape, and succeeded, and got married in Germany. My aunt was born in Germany before they left there to come to America. My grandmother learned 11 languages during that time.

omgthatdress:

wow you could turn that into a movie

ibtasem:

heartsthatdaywilltremble:

“You educate a man; you educate a man. You educate a woman; you educate a generation.”

and this is what the western news don´t show. Educated and Covered Muslim women are unimaginable for them.

ibtasem:

heartsthatdaywilltremble:

“You educate a man; you educate a man. You educate a woman; you educate a generation.”

and this is what the western news don´t show. Educated and Covered Muslim women are unimaginable for them.

(via pocketful-of-rainbows)

In alphabetical order I am made up of love for:

Aladdin. Alice in Wonderland. Art. Batman. The Beatles. Bones. Cute People. Cute Things. Harry Potter. Jack Hodgins. Life. London. My dog. Peter Pan. Puppets. Pushing Daisies. Starkid. Thundercats.

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